Boxing

Australia and Olympic Boxing

Australia’s first Olympic boxer and medallist, was the famous sporting all-rounder Reginald “Snowy” Baker in London in 1908. Baker was defeated in the middleweight final by Johnny Douglas, who was later to captain England in Test cricket. The next medal came in Melbourne in 1956 with Kevin Hogarth’s bronze in the welterweight division. Tony Madigan and Ollie Taylor headed the boxing team in Rome 1960 and both won bronze medals in the light heavyweight and bantamweight categories respectively.  Madigan lost to a precocious Cassius Clay (now known as Muhammad Ali) in a semi-final. Seoul 1988 saw Grahame “Spike” Cheney equal Baker’s performance by winning a silver medal, as a light welterweight.

Women’s boxing was introduced at the London 2012 Games with middleweight Naomi Fischer-Rasmussen Australia's only female competitor. Unfortunately Fischer-Rasmussen lost her opening bout. Australia had a male representative in every weight division in London, with light-welterweight Jeff Horn Australia's best performer after reaching the quarterfinals. 

Olympic History

Boxing was not included on the program for the first modern Olympics in Athens 1896 because it was considered dangerous and not a gentlemanly sport. The sport gained Olympic status in St Louis 1904, in a nation where it was very popular. All the competitors in the St Louis boxing tournament were Americans. Oliver Kirk won the bantamweight and featherweight titles and became the only person to win two boxing gold medals at the same Olympics. Women also gave a demonstration of boxing in St Louis. From 1904 onwards, except for Stockholm 1912 where it was prohibited under Swedish law, men’s boxing has been an Olympic sport.

Women’s boxing was added to the Olympic program for London 2012 with three weight categories: 51kg flyweight, 60kg lightweight and 75kg middleweight.

Sport Format

Athletes are paired off at random for the Olympic Games, without regard to ranking. They fight in a single-elimination tournament, but, unlike most Olympic events, both losing semi-finalists receive bronze medals.

Each boxing bout lasts four rounds of two minutes each, with a one-minute break. A score is marked when the athlete hits their opponent at the front part of the head or on the upper part of the body - above the belt line. However, the score is registered only when at least three of the five judges acknowledge the hit simultaneously.

The total number of valid points at the end of the fourth round determines the winner.